29+ quotes from Bend Sinister by Vladimir Nabokov

Quotes from Bend Sinister

Vladimir Nabokov ·  208 pages

Rating: (3.3K votes)


“Theoretically there is no absolute proof that one's awakening in the morning (the finding oneself again in the saddle of one's personality) is not really a quite unprecedented event, a perfectly original birth.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“The square root of I is I.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Devices which in some curious new way imitate nature are attractive to simple minds.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“He was one of those persons whom one loves not because of some lustrous streak of talent (this retired businessman possessed none), but because every moment spent with them fits exactly the gauge of one's life. There are friendships like circuses, waterfalls, libraries; there are others comparable to old dressing gowns. You found nothing especially attractive about Maximov's mind if you took it apart: his ideas were conservative, his tastes undistinguished: but somehow or other these dull components formed a wonderfully comfortable and harmonious whole.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Do all people have that? A face, a phrase, a landscape, an air bubble from the past suddenly floating up as if released by the head warden's child from a cell in the brain while the mind is at work on some totally different matter? Something of the sort also occurs just before falling asleep when what you think you are thinking is not at all what you think. Or two parallel passenger trains of thought, one overtaking the other.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“anyone can create the future but only a wise man can create the past”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“An oblong puddle inset in the coarse asphalt; like a fancy footprint filled to the brim with quicksilver; like a spatulate hole through which you can see the nether sky. Surrounded, I note, by a diffuse tentacled black dampness where some dull dun dead leaves have stuck. Drowned, I should say, before the puddle had shrunk to its present size.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“I esteem my colleagues as I do my own self, I esteem them for two things: because they are able to find perfect felicity in specialized knowledge and because they are not apt to commit physical murder.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“We have imagined that a white hospital train with a white Diesel engine has taken you through many a tunnel to a mountainous country by the sea. You are getting well there. But you cannot write because your fingers are so very weak. Moonbeams cannot hold even a white pencil. The picture is pretty, but how long can it stay on the screen? We expect the next slide, but the magic-lantern man has none left. Shall we let the theme of a long separation expand till it breaks into tears? Shall we say (daintily handling the disinfected white symbols) that the train is Death and the nursing home Paradise? Or shall we leave the picture to fade by itself, to mingle with other fading impressions? But we want to write letters to you even if you cannot answer. Shall we suffer the slow wobbly scrawl (we can manage our name and two or three words of greeting) to work its conscientious and unnecessary way across a post card which will never be mailed? Are not these problems so hard to solve because my own mind is not made up yet in regard to your death? My intelligence does not accept the transformation of physical discontinuity into the permanent continuity of a nonphysical element escaping the obvious law, nor can it accept the inanity of accumulating incalculable treasures of thought and sensation, and thought-behind-thought and sensation-behind-sensation, to lose them all at once and forever in a fit of black nausea followed by infinite nothingness. Unquote.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Nothing on earth really matters, there is nothing to fear, and death is but a question of style, a mere literary device, a musical resolution.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“We live in a stocking which is in the process of being turned inside out, without our ever knowing for sure to what phase of the process our moment of consciousness corresponds.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“He had liked her enormously, and he loved Krug with the same passion that a big sleek long-flewed hound feels for the high-booted hunter who reeks of the marsh as he leans towards the red fire. Krug could take aim at a flock of the most popular and sublime human thoughts and bring down a wild goose any time. But he could not kill death.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Nature had once produced an Englishman whose domed head had been a hive of words; a man who had only to breathe on any particle of his stupendous vocabulary to have that particle live and expand and throw out tremulous tentacles until it became a complex image with a pulsing brain and correlated limbs. Three centuries later, another man, in another country, was trying to render these rhythms and metaphors in a different tongue. This process entailed a prodigious amount of labour, for the necessity of which no real reason could be given. It was as if someone, having seen a certain oak tree (further called Individual T) growing in a certain land and casting its own unique shadow on the green and brown ground, had proceeded to erect in his garden a prodigiously intricate piece of machinery which in itself was as unlike that or any other tree as the translator's inspiration and language were unlike those of the original author, but which, by means of ingenious combination of parts, light effects, breeze-engendering engines, would, when completed, cast a shadow exactly similar to that of Individual T - the same outline, changing in the same manner, with the same double and single spots of sun rippling in the same position, at the same hour of the day. From a practical point of view, such a waste of time and material (those headaches, those midnight triumphs that turn out to be disasters in the sober light of morning!) was almost criminally absurd, since the greatest masterpiece of imitation presupposed a voluntary limitation of thought, in submission to another man's genius.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Old Azureus's manner of welcoming people was a silent rhapsody. Ecstatically beaming, slowly, tenderly, he would take your hand between his soft palms, hold it thus as if it were a long sought treasure or a sparrow all fluff and heart, in moist silence, peering at you the while with his beaming wrinkles rather than with his eyes, and then, very slowly, the silvery smile would start to dissolve, the tender old hands would gradually release their hold, a blank expression replace the fervent light of his pale fragile face, and he would leave you as if he had made a mistake, as if after all you were not the loved one - the loved one whom, the next moment, he would espy in another corner, and again the smile would dawn, again the hands would enfold the sparrow, again it would all dissolve.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“And what agony, thought Krug the thinker, to love so madly a little creature, formed in some mysterious fashion (even more mysterious to us than it had been to the very first thinkers in their pale olive gloves) by the fusion of two mysteries, or rather two sets of a trillion of mysteries each; formed by a fusion which is, at the same time, a matter of choice and a matter of chance and a matter of pure enchantment; thus formed and then permitted to accumulate trillions of its own mysteries; the whole suffused with consciousness, which is the only real thing in the world and the greatest mystery of all.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Unfortunately his urge to write had suddenly petered out and he did not know what to do with himself. He was not sleepy having slept after dinner. The brandy only added to the nuisance. He was a big heavy man of the hairy sort with a somewhat Beethovenlike face. He had lost his wife in November. He had taught philosophy. He was exceedingly virile. His name was Adam Krug.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“To each, or about each, of his colleagues he had said at one time or other, something... something impossible to recall in this or that case and difficult to define in general terms -- some careless bright and harsh trifle that had grazed a stretch of raw flesh.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Paduk and all the rest wrote on steadily, but Krug's failure was complete, a baffling and hideous disaster, for he had been busy becoming an elderly man instead of learning the simple but now unobtainable passages which they, mere boys, had memorized.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Non può esservi alcuna sottomissione – perché il fatto stesso che parliamo di questi argomenti indica che vi è curiosità, e la curiosità è insubordinazione nella forma più pura.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Професоре, това е само предложение – изрече телефонът. – Към държавния глава обикновено не се обръщат с dragotzennyi.
- А сега да ти кажа аз. Идват хората при мен и питат. Защо бездейства този достоен и интелигентен човек? Защо не служи той на държавата? И аз отговарям: не знам. И те също като мен правят какви ли не предположения.
- Кои са те? – сухо попита Круг.
- Приятели, приятели на закона, приятели на законодателя. И селските братства. И градските клубове. И великите масонски ложи. Защо е така, поради каква причина този човек не е с нас? Аз само повтарям техните въпроси.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Аварийна спирачка на времето. Какъвто и да е настоящият момент, аз съм го задържал. Твърде късно. Придържайки се към този прост метод, през нашите, колко бяха, дванайсет, дванайсет години и три месеца съвместен живот би следвало да съм обездвижил стотици хиляди такива мигновения, заплащайки може би умопомрачителни глоби, но съм успявал да спра влака. Кажи. Защо го направи? – би попитал облещеният кондуктор. Защото ми харесваше гледката. Защото исках да спра тези бягащи дървета и пътечката, която се виеше между тях. Като настъпя нейната изплъзваща се опашка. Това, което я сполетя, вероятно нямаше да ѝ се случаи, ако бях имал навика да спирам едно или друго късче от нашия съвместен живот, профилактично, пророчески, да позволявам на този или онзи миг да поеме спокойно дъх и да си почине. Да укротявам времето. Да дам отдих на пулса ѝ. Да се грижа за живота, живота – нашия пациент.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Ембър много я харесваше и обичаше Круг с такава страст, каквато голяма хрътка с лъскава козина и провиснали бърни изпитва към вонещия на блато, приклекнал край аления огън ловджия с високи ботуши. Круг притежаваше способността просто така, когато му хрумне, да се прицели в ято от най-популярни и възвишени човешки мисли и с един изстрел мигновено да го приземи. Но не можеше да убие смъртта.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Круг се поддаде на нежния топъл напор на сълзите, с присъщата за това действие наслада. Чувството не облекчение не продължи дълго, защото едва им бе разрешил да потекат, и те рукнаха, безмилостно горещи и обилни, замъглиха очите му и го задавиха. Обгърнат от спазматична мъгла, той вървеше по павираната „Обожемой Лейн“ към брега. Опита да се поизкашля, но това само предизвика нов конвулсивен пристъп на сълзи. Вече съжаляваше, че се бе поддал на изкушението, защото не можеше да върне назад своето отстъпление и треперещият човек в него бе залят от сълзи. Както обикновено, той различаваше треперещия от наблюдателя: гледащ със загриженост, със съчувствие, с въздишка или с вежливо удивление. Това бе последното убежище на ненавистния му дуализъм. Корен квадратен от Аз е равен на Аз. Бележки под линия, незабравки. От някакъв абстрактен бряг другоземецът спокойна наблюдава течението на местната скръб. Позната фигура, макар анонимна и отчуждена. Той видя, че хлипам, когато бях десетгодишен, и ме отведе до едно огледало в някаква необитаема стая (с празна клетка за папагал в ъгъла), за да разгледам внимателно своето размиващо се лице. Повдигнал вежди, той слушаше как говоря неща, които изобщо нямах право да говоря. Във всяка от маските, които изпробвах, имаше прорези за неговите очи. Дори в миговете, когато бивах разтърсван от конвулсии, най-високо ценени от мъжа. Моят спасител. Моят свидетел. И Круг бръкна в джоба за кърпичката си, неясно бяло петно някъде в глъбините на неговата лична нощ. Измъквайки се най-после от лабиринта на джобовете, той попи и изтри тъмното небе и обезформените къщи, и видя, че наближава моста.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Личността, чието име току-що бе произнесено, професор Адам Круг, философът, седеше малко встрани, потънал в едно кресло, опрял косматите си ръце на подлакътниците. Беше едър тежък човек над четирийсетте, с чорлава, пепелява или леко прошарена коса и грубо изсечено лице, навеждащо на мисълта за недодялан шахматист или навъсен композитор, но по-интелигентно. Силното компактно и мрачно чело, притежаваше някак особено херметично изражение (банков сейф, зид на затвор?), присъщо за челото на всеки мислител. Мозък, съставен от вода, разни химически съединения и група високомодифицирани мазнини. Бледите стоманеносиви очи в почти правоъгълни орбити, полузакрити от гъсти вежди, които някога са ги защитавали от отровните извержения на вече изчезнали птици – хипотезата на Шнайдер. Ушите бяха големи, орбасли с косми отвътре. Носът му бе обрамчен от две дълбоки гънки, спускащи се по широките бузи. Тази сутрин не беше се бръснал. Носеше силно омачкан тъмен костюм и неизменната тъмнолилава папийонка на (някога бели, а сега неопределен цвят) точки, с разкъсана лява вътрешна фльонга. Не особено чистата яка беше от типа отворена, тоест с удобна триъгълна чупка за адамовата ябълка. Носеше характерните обувки с дебели подметки и старомодни черни гети. Какво още? Ах, да – разсеяното почукване с показалец по подлакътника на креслото.

Под тази видима повърхност копринена риза обгръщаше мощния му торс и уморените бедра. Тя бе дълбоко втъкната в наполеонки, които от своя страна бяха напъхани в чорапите: известно му бе за слуховете, че не носи чорапи (оттам и гетите), но това не беше истина; в действителност такива имаше на краката му – хубави, скъпи, бледолилави, копринени.
Под всичко това беше топлата бяла кожа. Мравешка пътека, тесен капилярен керван вървеше нагоре по средата на корема му, за да се прекъсне точно до пъпа. По-тъмна и по-гъста растителност бе разперила крила на гърдите му.

Под това имаше мъртва съпруга и спящо дете.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Например – продължи историкът, игнорирайки репликата, - без съмнение ние можем да изберем определени събития от миналото, които съответстват на преживявания от нас период, когато зачервените ученически ръце са търкаляли снежната топка на идеята и тя нараствала, ставала все по-голяма и по-голяма, докато не се преобразила в снежен човек с накривена шапка и непрежно затъкната под мишницата метла. И тогава злобните очички внезапно примигнали, снегът се превърнал в плът, метлата в оръжие, и един напълно оформен тиран започнал да реже главите на малчуганите. Да, и преди се е случвало да разгонят парламента или сената и не за първи път някой невзрачен и антипатичен, но рядко упорит човек, със зъби и нокти да си проправи пътя в самата утроба на страната. Ала миналото не дава никакви указания на хората, които наблюдават тези събития и биха искали да ги предотвратят, не им препоръчва никакъв modus vivendi, поради простата причина, че то самото изобщо не е притежавало такъв по времето, когато е преливала през ръба на настоящето в пустотата, която в края на краищата то е запълнило.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Начинът, по който старият Азуреус посрещаше своите гости, можеше преспокойно да бъде уподобен на рапсодия без думи. Възторжено сияещ, той бавно и нежно поемаше ръката ти в меките си длани, задържаше я така, сякаш това е някакво отдавна търсено съкровище или врабче, цялото пух и с лудо блъскащо сърчице, вглеждаше се в теб с влажно безмълвие, не с очите, а по-скоро със заобикалящите ги лъчи на бръчиците, а после бавно-бавно сребристата усмивка започваше да се стапя, нежните стари ръце постепенно отпускаха хватката си, пламтящата светлина на деликатното му бледо лице биваше сменене от празно и нищо не говорещи изражение, и той отстъпваше далеч от теб, сякаш неволно се е припознал, като че ли все пак ти изобщо не си обичания, този любим, който в следващия момент той ще съзре в другия ъгъл на стаята и усмивката отново щеше да грейне, ръцете отново щяха да обгърнат врабчето, и после отново всичко щеше да се стопи и изчезне.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“- Хайде, старче, не прави глупости. Подпиши таз гадост – изръмжа Хедрон, като се приведе над Круг и отпусна на рамото му ръката с лулата. – Има ли някакво значение? Драсни я тази твоя комерсиално безценна заврънкулка. Хайде! Никой няма да пипне нашите кръгове, но все пак нали трябва да имаме място, където да ги чертаем.
- Не и в калта, уважаеми, не и в калта – назидателно рече Круг и за първи път се усмихна тази вечер.
- Хайде стига! Не се прави на надут педант – въздъхна Хедрон. – Защо да ме караш да се чувствам толкова неудобно? Аз подписах. И какво? Моите богове изобщо не се трогнаха.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“- Трябва да призная, че се възхитих от вас, професоре. Каквото и да говорим, вие сте единственият истински мъж сред онези безценни изкопаеми. Доколкото разбирам, ние не общувате много сколегите си, нали? Разжбира се, би трябвало да чувствате определена несъвместимост…
- Отново не познахте – процеди Круг, нарушавайки обета за мълчание. – Аз уважавам своите колеги толкова, колкото и себе си. Уважавам ги по две причини: защото умеят да откриват съвършеното щастие в специализирани познания, и защото нямат склонност към физическо насилие.
- Д-р Александър неправилно прие думите му за, както го бяха осведомили, една от типичните за Адам Круг (и забавляващи единствено него) мъгляви остроти, и предпазливо се засмя.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


“Няма ли да млъкнете? – избухна Круг, внезапно проявявайки странна грубост и дори жестокост, защото нищо в безобидното и добронамерено, макар и не много умно бръщолевене на младия учен (който се бе превърнал в дърдорко очевидно поради стеснителност, тъй характерна за пренапрегнатите и може би недохранени юноши, жертви на капитализма, комунизма и мастурбацията, когато случайно попаднат в обществото на наистина значителни личност, например някой личен приятел на началника или собственика на фирмата, а евентуално и на зет му, Гоголевич и прочее) не даваше повод за рязкото и троснато възклицание, все пак осигурило пълна тишина през останалата част от пътуването.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, quote from Bend Sinister


About the author

Vladimir Nabokov
Born place: in Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation
Born date April 22, 1899
See more on GoodReads

Popular quotes

“Our purpose in life isn’t to arrive at a destination where we find inspiration, just as the purpose of dancing isn’t to end up at a particular spot on the floor. The purpose of dancing – and of life – is to enjoy every moment and every step, regardless of where we are when the music ends.”
― Wayne W. Dyer, quote from Inspiration: Your Ultimate Calling


“Let them see my weakness, and let them see me overcome it.”
― Brandon Sanderson, quote from Mistborn Trilogy


“No man has the right to dictate what other men should perceive, create or produce, but all should be encouraged to reveal themselves, their perceptions and emotions, and to build confidence in the creative spirit.” ― Ansel Adams”
― Misty Griffin, quote from Tears of the Silenced: A True Crime and an American Tragedy; Severe Child Abuse and Leaving the Amish


“Why would you take a drug that is guaranteed to kill you in forty years? One reason, right? It's the only thing that will stop you dying tomorrow.”
― Sharon Moalem, quote from Survival of the Sickest: A Medical Maverick Discovers Why We Need Disease


“A voice may whisper that it was no image, but only imagination; it was a mirage, a fantasy. But as the water settles, with gentle ripples still visible where the arrows went in, the image will return. We will gaze at it once more, and know that in the Lord our labour is not in vain.”
― N.T. Wright, quote from The Resurrection of the Son of God


Interesting books

This Book Is Full of Spiders
(20K)
This Book Is Full of...
by David Wong
Life Before Legend: Stories of the Criminal and the Prodigy
(15K)
Life Before Legend:...
by Marie Lu
Changing the Game
(19.6K)
Changing the Game
by Jaci Burton
How the Mind Works
(15.5K)
How the Mind Works
by Steven Pinker
Promise Me
(22K)
Promise Me
by Harlan Coben
Just in Case
(3.3K)
Just in Case
by Meg Rosoff

About BookQuoters

BookQuoters is a community of passionate readers who enjoy sharing the most meaningful, memorable and interesting quotes from great books. As the world communicates more and more via texts, memes and sound bytes, short but profound quotes from books have become more relevant and important. For some of us a quote becomes a mantra, a goal or a philosophy by which we live. For all of us, quotes are a great way to remember a book and to carry with us the author’s best ideas.

We thoughtfully gather quotes from our favorite books, both classic and current, and choose the ones that are most thought-provoking. Each quote represents a book that is interesting, well written and has potential to enhance the reader’s life. We also accept submissions from our visitors and will select the quotes we feel are most appealing to the BookQuoters community.

Founded in 2018, BookQuoters has quickly become a large and vibrant community of people who share an affinity for books. Books are seen by some as a throwback to a previous world; conversely, gleaning the main ideas of a book via a quote or a quick summary is typical of the Information Age but is a habit disdained by some diehard readers. We feel that we have the best of both worlds at BookQuoters; we read books cover-to-cover but offer you some of the highlights. We hope you’ll join us.