Coping the quote
30+ quotes from The Complete Works by William Shakespeare

Quotes from The Complete Works

William Shakespeare ·  1248 pages

Rating: (47.1K votes)


“Who knows himself a braggart, let him fear this, for it will come to pass that every braggart shall be found an ass.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Would the fountain of your mind were clear again,
that I might water an ass at it!”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Could ever hear by tale or history, The course of true love never did run smooth;”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. JULIET Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss. ROMEO Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? JULIET Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. ROMEO O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. JULIET Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake. ROMEO Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take. Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged. JULIET Then have my lips the sin that they have took. ROMEO Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“he that drinks all night, and is hanged betimes in the morning, may sleep the sounder all the next day.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“There ‘s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ‘t is not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come: the readiness is all. Since no man has aught of what he leaves, what is ‘t to leave betimes? Hamlet. V.2”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Humanity is as much lacking as decency. Blood, suffering, does not move them. The court frequents bull and bear baitings; Elizabeth beats her maids, spits upon a courtier’s fringed coat, boxes Essex’s ears; great ladies beat their children and their servants. “The sixteenth century,” he says, “is like a den of lions. Amid passions so strong as these there is not one lacking. Nature appears here in all its violence, but also in all its fullness. If nothing has been softened, nothing has been mutilated. It is the entire man who is displayed, heart, mind, body, senses, with his noblest and finest aspirations, as with his most bestial and savage appetites, without the preponderance of any dominant passion to cast him altogether in one direction, to exalt or degrade him. He has not become rigid as he will under Puritanism.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“The fine purple cloaks, the holiday garments, elsewhere signs of gayety of mind, are stained with blood and bordered with black. Throughout a stern discipline, the axe ready for every suspicion of treason; “great men, bishops, a chancellor, princes, the king’s relations, queens, a protector kneeling in the straw, sprinkled the Tower with their blood; one after the other they marched past, stretched out their necks; the Duke of Buckingham, Queen Anne Boleyn, Queen Catherine Howard, the Earl of Surrey, Admiral Seymour, the Duke of Somerset, Lady Jane Grey and her husband, the Duke of Northumberland, the Earl of Essex, all on the throne, or on the steps of the throne, in the highest ranks of honor, beauty, youth, genius; of the bright procession nothing is left but senseless trunks, marred by the tender mercies of the executioner.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“some good I mean to do, Despite of mine own nature.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so: to”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Light, seeking light, doth light of light beguile; So ere you find where light in darkness lies, Your light grows dark by losing of your eyes.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“The language I have learn'd these forty years, My native English, now I must forego: And now my tongue's use is to me no more Than an unstringed viol or a harp, Or like a cunning instrument cased up, Or, being open, put into his hands That knows no touch to tune the harmony: Within my mouth you have engaol'd my tongue, Doubly portcullis'd with my teeth and lips; And dull unfeeling barren ignorance Is made my gaoler to attend on me. I am too old to fawn upon a nurse, Too far in years to be a pupil now: What is thy sentence then but speechless death, Which robs my tongue from breathing native breath?”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Thou know'st 'tis common; all that lives must die, Passing through nature to eternity.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable, Seem to me all the uses of this world!”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form;”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides; Who covers faults, at last shame them derides.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“There is some soul of goodness in things evil, Would men observingly distil it out. For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers, Which is both healthful and good husbandry: Besides, they are our outward consciences, And preachers to us all, admonishing That we should dress us fairly for our end. Thus may we gather honey from the weed, And make a moral of the devil himself.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Think when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth; For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass:”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Cardinal Wolsey, the butcher’s son, is indeed the hero of “Henry VIII.,” but his humble origin is only mentioned incidentally as something to be ashamed of.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“If music be the food of love, play on;”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“We have already shown by references to the contemporary drama that the plea of custom is not sufficient to explain Shakespeare’s attitude to the lower classes, but if we widen our survey to the entire field of English letters in his day, we shall see that he was running counter to all the best traditions of our literature. From the time of Piers Plowman down, the peasant had stood high with the great writers of poetry and prose alike. Chaucer’s famous circle of story-tellers at the Tabard Inn in Southwark was eminently democratic.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Sir, I am a true laborer; I earn that I eat, get that I wear; owe no man hate, envy no man’s happiness; glad of other men’s good, content with my harm; and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.” (As You Like It, Act 3, Sc. 2.)”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“The genius of Shakespeare lay in his power to so use the real and individual facts of life as to raise in the minds of his readers a broader and nobler conception of human life than they had conceived before. This is creative genius; this is the idealist dealing faithfully with realistic material; this is, as we should say in our day, the work of the artist as distinguished from the work of the photographer. It may be an admirable but it is not the highest work of the sculptor, the painter, or the writer, that does not reveal to the mind — that comes into relation with it something before out of his experience and beyond the facts either brought before him or with which he is acquainted.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“The barge she sat in, like a burnish’d throne, Burn’d on the water; the poop was beaten gold; Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick with them; the oars were silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water which they beat to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes. For her own person, It beggar’d all description. Antony and Cleopatra. II.2”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Round about the cauldron go; In the poison'd entrails throw. Toad, that under cold stone Days and nights has thirty-one Swelter'd venom sleeping got, Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“This royal throne of kings, this scepter'd isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall, Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands, This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England,”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“Such was the discipline of Elizabeth’s court that any man who struck another within it had his right hand chopped off by the executioner in a most horrible manner.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“There were multitudes of dependents fed at the great houses, and everywhere, according to means, a wide-open hospitality was maintained. Froude gives a notion of the style of living in earlier times by citing the details of a feast given when George Neville, brother of Warwick the king-maker, was made archbishop of York. There were present, including servants, thirty-five hundred persons. These are a few of the things used at the banquet: three hundred quarters of wheat, three hundred tuns of ale, one hundred and four tuns of wine, eighty oxen, three thousand geese, two thousand pigs, — four thousand conies, four thousand heronshaws, four thousand venison pasties cold and five hundred hot, four thousand cold tarts, four thousand cold custards, eight seals, four porpoises, and so on.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


“and yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together now-a-days; the more the pity that some honest neighbours will not make them friends.”
― William Shakespeare, quote from The Complete Works


About the author

William Shakespeare
Born place: Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England, The United Kingdom
See more on GoodReads

Popular quotes

“Listen, that girl is my world, and I can’t stand the thought of anyone hurting her. I’d handle this myself if I could play the game and be by her side at the same time, but I can’t”
― J. Sterling, quote from The Game Changer


“Okay. Good.’ He fumbled for his keys and held them out to her, but she did not take”
― Karin Slaughter, quote from Kisscut


“No one gets to tell you what your life means!”
― Jess Walter, quote from Beautiful Ruins


“One day. I knew she wasn’t saying soon or before too long because that would mean her dad was gone. She couldn’t say that. I understood. But one day was haunting me.”
― Abbi Glines, quote from Sometimes It Lasts


“You don't know what it's like, when your best friend disappears.”
― Scott Westerfeld, quote from Afterworlds


Interesting books

The Future of Us
(38.5K)
The Future of Us
by Jay Asher
The Redemption of Althalus
(13.5K)
The Redemption of Al...
by David Eddings
An Old-Fashioned Girl
(15.7K)
An Old-Fashioned Gir...
by Louisa May Alcott
Hard Eight
(100.9K)
Hard Eight
by Janet Evanovich
A World Without Heroes
(30.6K)
A World Without Hero...
by Brandon Mull
Fifth Grave Past the Light
(26.2K)
Fifth Grave Past the...
by Darynda Jones

About BookQuoters

BookQuoters is a community of passionate readers who enjoy sharing the most meaningful, memorable and interesting quotes from great books. As the world communicates more and more via texts, memes and sound bytes, short but profound quotes from books have become more relevant and important. For some of us a quote becomes a mantra, a goal or a philosophy by which we live. For all of us, quotes are a great way to remember a book and to carry with us the author’s best ideas.

We thoughtfully gather quotes from our favorite books, both classic and current, and choose the ones that are most thought-provoking. Each quote represents a book that is interesting, well written and has potential to enhance the reader’s life. We also accept submissions from our visitors and will select the quotes we feel are most appealing to the BookQuoters community.

Founded in 2018, BookQuoters has quickly become a large and vibrant community of people who share an affinity for books. Books are seen by some as a throwback to a previous world; conversely, gleaning the main ideas of a book via a quote or a quick summary is typical of the Information Age but is a habit disdained by some diehard readers. We feel that we have the best of both worlds at BookQuoters; we read books cover-to-cover but offer you some of the highlights. We hope you’ll join us.