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29+ quotes from Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens

Quotes from Our Mutual Friend

Charles Dickens ·  801 pages

Rating: (22.2K votes)


“And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Give me a moment, because I like to cry for joy. It's so delicious, John dear, to cry for joy.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Love, though said to be afflicted with blindness, is a vigilant watchman.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“A heart well worth winning, and well won. A heart that, once won, goes through fire and water for the winner, and never changes, and is never daunted.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death. And O what a bright old song it is, that O 'tis love, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round!”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“[She wasn't] a logically reasoning woman, but God is good, and hearts may count in heaven as high as heads.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“And this is the eternal law. For, Evil often stops short at istelf and dies with the doer of it! but Good, never.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“And yet I love him. I love him so much and so dearly, that when I sometimes think my life may be but a weary one, I am proud of it and glad of it. I am proud and glad to suffer something for him, even though it is of no service to him, and he will never know of it or care for it.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Meow says the cat ,quack says the duck , Bow wow wow says the dog !
Grrrr!”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“And O
there are days
i this life,
worth life and
worth death”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Her heart--is given him, with all its love and truth. She would joyfully die with him, or better than that, die for him. She knows he has failings, but she thinks they have grown up through his being like one cast away, for the want of something to trust in, and care for, and think well of. And she says, that lady rich and beautiful that I can never come near, 'Only put me in that empty place, only try how little I mind myself, only prove what a world of things I will do and bear for you, and I hope that you might even come to be so much better than you are, through me who am so much worse, and hardly worth the thinking of beside you.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“This reminds me, Godmother, to ask you a serious question. You are as wise as wise can be (having been brought up by the fairies), and you can tell me this: Is it better to have had a good thing and lost it, or never to have had it?”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Are you thankful for not being young?'
'Yes, sir. If I was young, it would all have to be gone through again, and the end would be a weary way off, don't you see?...”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“No one is useless in this world,' retorted the Secretary, 'who lightens the burden of it for any one else.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“I never thought before, that there was a woman in the world who could affect me so much by saying so little. But don't be hard in your construction of me. You don't know what my state of mind towards you is. You don't know how you haunt and bewilder me. You don't know how the cursed carelessness that is over-officious in helping me at every other turning of my life WON'T help me here. You have struck it dead, I think, and I sometimes wish you had struck me dead along with it.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“I have made up my mind that I must have money, Pa. I feel that I can't beg it, borrow it, or steal it; and so I have resolved that I must marry it.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“You hear, Eugene?' said Lightwood over his shoulder. 'You are deeply interested in lime.'
'Without lime,' returned that unmoved barrister at law, 'my existence would be unilluminated by a ray of hope.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“I am in a ridiculous humour,' quoth Eugene; 'I am a ridiculous fellow. Everything is ridiculous. Come along!”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“and he glanced at the backs of the books, with an awakened curiosity that went below the binding. No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“what I mean is, that I am under the influence of some tremendous attraction
which I have resisted in vain, and which overmasters me”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“But he is only stunned by the unvanquishable difficulty of his existence.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“There was an innocent piece of dinner-furniture that went upon easy castors and was kept over a livery stable-yard in Duke Street, Saint James's, when not in use, to whom the Veneerings were a source of blind confusion. The name of this article was Twemlow.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Wish me everything that you can wish for the woman you dearly love, and I have as good as got it, John. I have better than got it, John.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Bradley Headstone, in his decent black coat and waistcoat, and decent white shirt, and decent formal black tie, and decent pantaloons of pepper and salt, with his decent silver watch in his pocket and its decent hair-guard round his neck, looked a thoroughly decent young man of six-and-twenty. He was never seen in any other dress, and yet there was a certain stiffness in his manner of wearing this, as if there were a want of adaptation between him and it, recalling some mechanics in their holiday clothes. He had acquired mechanically a great store of teacher's knowledge. He could do mental arithmetic mechanically, sing at sight mechanically, blow various wind instruments mechanically, even play the great church organ mechanically. From his early childhood up, his mind had been a place of mechanical stowage. The arrangement of his wholesale warehouse, so that it might be always ready to meet the demands of retail dealers history here, geography there, astronomy to the right, political economy to the left—natural history, the physical sciences, figures, music, the lower mathematics, and what not, all in their several places—this care had imparted to his countenance a look of care; while the habit of questioning and being questioned had given him a suspicious manner, or a manner that would be better described as one of lying in wait. There was a kind of settled trouble in the face. It was the face belonging to a naturally slow or inattentive intellect that had toiled hard to get what it had won, and that had to hold it now that it was gotten. He always seemed to be uneasy lest anything should be missing from his mental warehouse, and taking stock to assure himself.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“You mightn't think it, but Sloppy is a beautiful reader of a newspaper. He do the Police in different voices'
The visitors again considered it a point of politeness to look at Sloppy, who, looking at them, suddenly threw back his head, extended his moth to the utmost width, and laughed loud and long. At this the two innocents, with their brains in that apparent danger, laughed, and Mrs. Higden laughed, and the orphan laughed, and then the visitors laughed. Which was more cheerful than intelligible.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“The white face of the winter day came sluggishly on, veiled in a frosty mist; and the shadowy ships in the river slowly changed to black substances; and the sun, blood-red on the eastern marshes behind dark masts and yards, seemed filled with the ruins of a forest it had set on fire.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“I tell you what, Mr. Fledgeby,' said Lammle, advancing on him. 'Since you presume to contradict me, I'll assert myself a little. Give me your nose!'
Fledgeby covered it with his hand instead, and said, retreating, 'I beg you won't!'

... 'Say no more, say no more!' Mr. Lammle repeated in a magnificent tone. 'Give me your'--Fledgeby started-- 'hand.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


“Show Pleasant Riderhood a Wedding in the street, and she only saw two people taking out a regular license to quarrel and fight. Show her a Christening, and she saw a little heathen personage having a quite superfluous name bestowed upon it, inasmuch as it would be commonly addressed by some abusive epithet; which little personage was not in the least wanted by anybody, and would be shoved and banged out of everybody's way, until it should grow big enough to shove and bang. Show her a Funeral, and she saw an unremunerative ceremony in the nature of a black masquerade, conferring a temporary gentility on the performers, at an immense expense, and representing the only formal party ever given by the deceased. Show her a live father, and she saw but a duplicate of her own father, who from her infancy had been taken with fits and starts of discharging his duty to her, which duty was always incorporated in the form of a fist or a leathern strap, and being discharged hurt her. All things considered, therefore, Pleasant Riderhood was not so very, very bad.”
― Charles Dickens, quote from Our Mutual Friend


About the author

Charles Dickens
Born place: in Portsmouth, England
Born date February 7, 1812
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