Quotes from Around the World in Eighty Days

Jules Verne ·  252 pages

Rating: (148.9K votes)


“Anything one man can imagine, other men can make real.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“The chance which now seems lost may present itself at the last moment.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“I see that it is by no means useless to travel, if a man wants to see something new”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“But what then? What had he really gained by all this trouble? What had he brought back from this long and weary journey?
Nothing, you say? Perhaps so; nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men!
Truly, would you not for less than that make the tour around the world?”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Why, you are a man of heart!"
"Sometimes," replied Phileas Fogg, quietly. "When I have the time.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“It may be taken for granted that, rash as the Americans are, when they are prudent there is good reason for it.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Her shining tresses, divided in two parts, encircle the harmonious contour of her white and delicate cheeks, brilliant in their glow and freshness. Her ebony brows have the form and charm of the bow of Kama, the god of love, and beneath her long silken lashes the purest reflections and a celestial light swim, as in the sacred lakes of Himalaya, in the black pupils of her great clear eyes. Her teeth, fine, equal, and white, glitter between her smiling lips like dewdrops in a passion-flower's half-enveloped breast. Her delicately formed ears, her vermilion hands, her little feet, curved and tender as the lotus-bud, glitter with the brilliancy of the loveliest pearls of Ceylon, the most dazzling diamonds of Golconda. Her narrow and supple waist, which a hand may clasp around, sets forth the outline of her rounded figure and the beauty of her bosom, where youth in its flower displays the wealth of its treasures; and beneath the silken folds of her tunic she seems to have been modelled in pure silver by the godlike hand of Vicvarcarma, the immortal sculptor.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“But Phileas Fogg, who was not traveling, but only describing a circumfrence,...”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“It's really useful to travel, if you want to see new things.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“A well-used minimum suffices for everything.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Mr. Fogg accordingly tasted the dish, but, despite its spiced sauce, found it far from palatable. He rang for the landlord, and, on his appearance, said, fixing his clear eyes upon him, "Is this rabbit, sir?"

"Yes, my lord," the rogue boldly replied, "rabbit from the jungles."

"And this rabbit did not mew when he was killed?"

"Mew, my lord! What, a rabbit mew! I swear to you—"

"Be so good, landlord, as not to swear, but remember this: cats were formerly considered, in India, as sacred animals. That was a good time."

"For the cats, my lord?"

"Perhaps for the travellers as well!”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Mr. Fogg played, not to win, but for the sake of playing.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“As for Phileas Fogg, it seemed just as if the typhoon were a part of his programme”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“One single supporter remained faithful to him: an old paralytic, Lord Albermarle. The noble lord, confined to his armchair, would have given his whole fortune to be able to travel around the world, in ten years even; and he bet four thousand pounds on Phileas Fogg.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“I see that it is by no means useless to travel, if a man wants to see something new.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT RECEIVES A NEW PROOF THAT FORTUNE FAVORS THE BRAVE”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Was he being devoured by one of those secret rages, all the more terrible because contained, and which only burst forth, with irresistible force, at the last moment?”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“A minimum put to good use is enough for anything.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“If to live in this style is to be eccentric, it must be confessed that there is something good in eccentricity.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“He lived alone, and, so to speak, outside of every social relation; and as he knew that in this world account must be taken of friction, and that friction retards, he never rubbed against anybody.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Phileas Fogg, having shut the door of his house at half-past eleven, and having put his right foot before his left five hundred and seventy-five times, and his left foot before his right five hundred and seventy-six times, reached the Reform Club”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“As for seeing the town, the idea never occurred to him, for he was the sort of Englishman who, on his travels, gets his servant to do his sightseeing for him.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“...why, I've just this instant found out... that we might have gone around the world in only seventy-eight days.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“His countenance possessed in the highest degree what physiognomists call "repose in action," a quality of those who act rather than talk.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Monsieur is going to leave home?" "Yes," returned Phileas Fogg. "We are going round the world.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Passepartout was astounded, and, though ready to attempt anything to get over Medicine Creek, thought the experiment proposed a little too American.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager,”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“Unhappily for his master, as well as himself, his curiosity drew him unconsciously farther off than he intended to go. At last, having seen the Parsee carnival wind away in the distance, he was turning his steps towards the station, when he happened to espy the splendid pagoda on Malabar Hill, and was seized with an irresistible desire to see its interior. He was quite ignorant that it is forbidden to Christians to enter certain Indian temples, and that even the faithful must not go in without first leaving their shoes outside”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


“London time, and on regarding that of the countries he had passed through as quite false and unreliable. Now, on this day, though he had not changed the hands, he found that his watch exactly agreed with the ship's chronometers. His triumph was hilarious. He would have liked to know what Fix would say if he were aboard! "The rogue told me a lot of stories," repeated Passepartout, "about the meridians, the sun, and the moon! Moon, indeed! moonshine more likely! If one listened to that sort of people, a pretty sort of time one would keep! I was sure that the sun would some day regulate itself by my watch!" Passepartout was ignorant that, if the face of his watch had been divided into twenty-four hours, like the Italian clocks, he would have no reason for exultation; for the hands of his watch would then, instead of as now indicating nine o'clock in the morning, indicate nine o'clock in the evening, that is, the twenty-first hour after midnight precisely the difference between London time and that of the one hundred and eightieth meridian. But if Fix had been able to explain this purely physical effect, Passepartout would not have admitted, even if he had comprehended it. Moreover, if the detective had been on board at that moment, Passepartout would have joined issue with him on a quite different subject, and in an entirely different manner.”
― Jules Verne, quote from Around the World in Eighty Days


About the author

Jules Verne
Born place: in Nantes, Kingdom of France
Born date February 8, 1828
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Popular quotes

“I am in this same river. I can't much help it. I admit it: I'm racist. The other night I saw a group (or maybe a pack?) or white teenagers standing in a vacant lot, clustered around a 4x4, and I crossed the street to avoid them; had they been black, I probably would have taken another street entirely. And I'm misogynistic. I admit that, too. I'm a shitty cook, and a worse house cleaner, probably in great measure because I've internalized the notion that these are woman's work. Of course, I never admit that's why I don't do them: I always say I just don't much enjoy those activities (which is true enough; and it's true enough also that many women don't enjoy them either), and in any case, I've got better things to do, like write books and teach classes where I feel morally superior to pimps. And naturally I value money over life. Why else would I own a computer with a hard drive put together in Thailand by women dying of job-induced cancer? Why else would I own shirts mad in a sweatshop in Bangladesh, and shoes put together in Mexico? The truth is that, although many of my best friends are people of color (as the cliche goes), and other of my best friends are women, I am part of this river: I benefit from the exploitation of others, and I do not much want to sacrifice this privilege. I am, after all, civilized, and have gained a taste for "comforts and elegancies" which can be gained only through the coercion of slavery. The truth is that like most others who benefit from this deep and broad river, I would probably rather die (and maybe even kill, or better, have someone kill for me) than trade places with the men, women, and children who made my computer, my shirt, my shoes.”
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