26+ quotes from Complete Works by Plato

Quotes from Complete Works

Plato ·  1808 pages

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“What a strange thing that which men call pleasure seems to be, and how astonishing the relation it has with what is thought to be its opposite, namely pain! A man cannot have both at the same time. Yet if he pursues and catches the one, he is almost always bound to catch the other also, like two creatures with one head.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Whenever someone, on seeing something, realizes that that which he now sees wants to be like some other reality but falls short and cannot be like that other since it is inferior, do we agree that one who thinks this must have prior knowledge of that to which he says it is like, but deficiently so?”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Well, you know what happens to lovers: whenever they see a lyre, a garment or anything else that their beloved is accustomed to use, they know the lyre, and the image of the boy to whom it belongs comes into their mind.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“For this," he said, "is the great error of our day in the treatment of the human body, that physicians separate the soul from the body.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Men say that we ought not to enquire into the supreme God and the nature of the universe, nor busy ourselves in searching out the causes of things, and that such enquiries are impious; whereas the very opposite is the truth.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“He’s garbage, he cares about nothing but the truth.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“You wouldn’t know him if I told you the name. HIPPIAS: But I know right now he’s an ignoramus.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“for he knows nothing, and thinks that he knows; I neither know nor think that I know.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“a man who is good for anything ought not to calculate the chance of living or dying; he ought only to consider whether in doing anything he is doing right or wrong - acting the part of a good man or of a bad.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Eat and drink and sit with the mighty, and make yourself agreeable to them; for from the good you will learn what is good, but if you mix with the bad you will lose the intelligence which you already have.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“«Poderoso Júpiter, dadnos bienes; ya te los pidamos o no, y aleja de nosotros los males, aun cuando te los pidamos.»”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“The great enemy of Plato is the world, not exactly in the theological sense, yet in one not wholly different--the world as the hater of truth and lover of appearance, occupied in the pursuit of gain and pleasure rather than of knowledge, banded together against the few good and wise men, and devoid of true education.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Accordingly, no book can actually embody the knowledge of anything
of philosophical importance; only a mind can do that, since only a
mind can have this capacity to interpret and reinterpret its own understandings.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“The physician of the soul is aware that his patient will receive no nourishment unless he has been cleaned out; and the soul of the Great King himself, if he has not undergone this purification, is unclean and impure.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“The not- beautiful is as real as the beautiful, the not-just as the just. And the essence of the not-beautiful is to be separated from and opposed to a certain kind of existence which is termed beautiful. And this opposition and negation is the not-being of which we are in search, and is one kind of being.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“If a person does not attend to the meaning of terms as they are commonly used in argument, he may be involved even in greater paradoxes”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“lo semejante se une siempre a su semejante.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“all started at the Temple of Apollo In Delphi. One of his friends approached the oracle with the question: “Is anyone wiser than Socrates?” the answer was “No.” Socrates was profoundly puzzled by this episode. He claimed to know”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“You ask a question, I said, to which a reply can only be given in a parable. Yes, Socrates; and that is a way of speaking to which you are not at all accustomed, I suppose.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“To the passionate language of Parmenides, Plato replies in a strain equally passionate:--What! has not Being mind? and is not Being capable of being known? and, if this is admitted, then capable of being affected or acted upon?--in motion, then, and yet not wholly incapable of rest. Already we have been compelled to attribute opposite determinations to Being. And the answer to the difficulty about Being may be equally the answer to the difficulty about Not-being.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Like mythology, Greek philosophy has a tendency to personify ideas. And the Sophist is not merely a teacher of rhetoric for a fee of one or fifty drachmae (Crat.), but an ideal of Plato's in which the falsehood of all mankind is reflected.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“Knowledge is prior to any particular knowledge, and exists not in the previous state of the individual, but of the race. It is potential, not actual, and can only be appropriated by strenuous exertion.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“There is no need, however, to be angry at this ambition of theirs-- which may be forgiven; for every man ought to be loved who says and manfully pursues and works out anything which is at all like wisdom: at the same time we shall do well to see them as they really are.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“The clearest argument against Plato’s authorship is probably that Plato never wrote a work whose interpretation was as simple and straightforward as that of Alcibiades.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“The ordinary logic is also jealous of the explanation of negation as relation, because seeming to take away the principle of contradiction. Plato, as far as we know, is the first philosopher who distinctly enunciated this principle; and though we need not suppose him to have been always consistent with himself, there is no real inconsistency between his explanation of the negative and the principle of contradiction. Neither the Platonic notion of the negative as the principle of difference, nor the Hegelian identity of Being and Not-being, at all touch the principle of contradiction. For what is asserted about Being and Not-Being only relates to our most abstract notions, and in no way interferes with the principle of contradiction employed in the concrete. Because Not-being is identified with Other, or Being with Not-being, this does not make the proposition 'Some have not eaten' any the less a contradiction of 'All have eaten.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


“To refer a subject to a negative class is unmeaning, unless the 'not' is a mere modification of the positive, as in the example of 'not honourable' and 'dishonourable'; or unless the class is characterized by the absence rather than the presence of a particular quality.”
― Plato, quote from Complete Works


About the author

Plato
Born place: in Athens, Greece
Born date February 22, 0428
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